Wednesday, 25 September 2013

Take a Dip

I've read a lot in the past few years about the so-called 'Miracle Dip' technique. I have always baulked at the price of the Army Painter dip when it is really just wood varnish with a different label. But I was in town and shopping in Wilkinson the other day when I thought I'd have a go at the old miracle dip technique and picked up a this for less than a fiver:


It was the darkest shade in the shop and at the same time I bought a load of cheap brushes to paint the stuff with rather than dipping the figure, it seemed to be less messy. I decided I'd use a Japanese HMG, one of several I have kicking about and I painted him in a white undercoat so that the colours would be bright and then painted him in basic block colours:


Then came the moment of truth. With brush in trembling hand I splurged the varnish all over the little fella.


I'd read reports that people have left the figures overnight to dry, but within an hour or so he was dry enough to touch, so I spray varnished him to try to reduce the gloss of the varnish:


It could probably do with a few more sprays before it looks matt though. So, am I pleased with the results? Yes I am, it shows how quick an army can be painted up and look reasonably decent. I did notice that the varnish congeals in places, like some of the deeper recesses, but that may be fixed with painting later. I'm not sure how it would work with my current technique of basing the figures first then painting, as the varnish may bleed onto the finished base. But that is something to experiment with as well. I am kicking myself that I didn't do this with my Malaya campaign figures earlier...

8 comments:

  1. I was not sure at first. But my god the result are cool. On 15mm there is no need to highlight. I do slap the stuff on but it is worth pulling off (oh err) the thick bits with a cheap brush.

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    1. Thanks Dean, yeah I was very happy with how it turned out. I agree, I think the figures are too small to really do anything with after the shading.

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  2. Wilckinsons is full of lovely Wargaming treats...thanks for tip on varnish

    Good blog as well

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    1. Thanks Eric, I'm glad you liked the blog, yeah a lot of my stuff comes from places like Wilkinson and even Poundland!

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  3. Dipping or painting on dip/wash changed my hobby for me, good work and find!

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    1. Thanks Fran, yeah, it certainly speeds up the process, I enjoy painting though, so I'm a bit torn...

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  4. You get a similar effect with a dark brown inkwash but that can also cause staining. If the figure comes out far too dark I just go over it with a very light overall drybrush of light tan. Works OK for twentieth century figures but probably not a good idea for Napoleonics!

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    1. Thanks Martin, I always find that a brown inkwash just makes the figure look muddy, maybe I am not mixing the wash properly. I will give this chap a dry brush and see how he looks. Thanks for the advice!

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